The Ultimate Type of Soil For Strawberries (For A Thriving Crop)

Strawberries can grow in many different types of soils, but it helps to know what type of soil is best for strawberries. This will help you pick the best location to plant your strawberries, as well as help you amend your soil type. 

We had amazing success with our first strawberry plot. It used to be an organic grain field where we set up our home, but the health of the soil was poor.

We made our first garden bed by tilling up the field and planting right into that soil. It was not the best soil for corn or cucumbers, but it was perfect for strawberry plants. 

They thrived. With a little compost added the third year, we picked buckets full of delicious and large strawberries. 

The best type of soil for strawberries is a sandy loam, with at least 3% of organic matter. Strawberries thrive in a sandier soil that has a lower content of nitrogen, as too rich soil will grow a lot of rich dark leaves but fewer berries. 

A couple of years later, we moved our strawberry bed 300 ft to the east, and the plants farthest to the east grew rapidly….but produced almost no berries.

Rich, loamy clay, this soil works great for potatoes, but not as well for strawberries. The high level of nitrogen produced a big patch of deep green leaves but produced little. 

Strawberries like light, sandy soil, but they will also grow in anything from loam to clay, as long as you have sufficient water drainage, and proper minerals and organic matter available. 

Keeping strawberries weed-free is also vital for a great crop, as strawberries do not do well when they have nutrient competition.

Preferred Soil Ph For Strawberries

The PH of the soil also makes a difference in how well your strawberries will grow and produce. Strawberries prefer a soil with slightly acidic soil, with a PH between 5.3 and 6.8.

This is ideal, but they will also grow in different conditions. However, knowing the preferred soil PH for strawberries can help you make informed decisions in amending your soil. 

If your soil if too low (below 5.3), you can raise the level by adding lime or wood ash. This will help alkalize the soil.

If your soil is too alkaline, you can make it more acidic by adding organic matter(like compost), or sulphur.

All of these are great organic soil amendments.   

Related Questions:

Are used coffee grounds good for strawberry plants?

Strawberries love used coffee grounds. I save most of mine to put in my compost, but you can also sprinkle them directly around your plants.

Used coffee grounds are a gardener’s best friend when it comes to building up your soil. Many people also claim they act as a wonderful deterrent to slugs and snails (which can feed on your strawberries), which is very helpful if you have those in your garden.

Do Strawberries Like Manure?

Manure is a tricky one when it comes to the soil for strawberries. Well composted manure, in small quantities, can be beneficial for strawberries.

However, manure is high in nitrogen and can work against your favor instead of for it. Remember, your goal is not to grow large plants, but rather plants that produce a lot of strawberries.

Strawberries do better when they have less foliage, as this will help prevent fungi and leaf mold. 

Are eggshells good for strawberries?

Eggs shells are another great soil enhancer.

They contain calcium as well as are a natural source of potassium. As they break down, eggshells will give an added layer of nutrients to your soil.

Eggshells are also suggested as a natural snail and slug deterrent, although it takes a large amount to deter them. 

Healthy Soil is key

For a healthy and thriving strawberry patch, healthy soil is key.

The preferred soil type for strawberries is a light, sandy loam but they will grow in a variety of different soil including clay. The fine, shallow roots of the strawberry plant lend themselves well to light, sandy soil.

With proper minerals and organic matter, you will be growing delicious strawberries in no time. 

For a complete Guide To Planting Strawberries, Check this Out.

In what type of soil are you planting your strawberries? Are they doing well?

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